Completing the HUD-9902 Report

This page explores the HUD-9902 section by section and provides users with tips and examples for filling out the form.

Find by Section

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Section 1: Counseling Agency Name

Verify that the name, ID, type, and address of your agency (and intermediary, if applicable) are correct as they appear on the HUD-9902.

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Section 2: Reporting Period and Budget

Verify that the reporting period and date submitted are correct as they appear on the HUD-9902. Include your total annual housing counseling program budget (all sources).

The start, or “From”, date is automatically populated, set at the beginning of the fiscal year. The end, or “To,” date is automatically populated, set at the end date of the selected reporting period. Verify that the report period is correct. The submission date will be automatically populated upon submission.

View more information about the reporting period dates on the 9902 General Overview page.

This report must reflect the cumulative housing counseling and education activity of an agency, starting at the beginning of the federal fiscal year through the end of the reporting period. Even if your agency was approved by HUD for less than the full year report period, include households served since the beginning of the applicable fiscal year.

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Section 3: Ethnicity of Households

Record the ethnicity of households for those who identified as Hispanic, not Hispanic, and those who chose not to respond.

Ethnicity categories are mandated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Households should self-identify their ethnicity, choosing between 3a and b. The following descriptions serve as a guide for self-identification.

  • Hispanic - A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term “Spanish origin” or “Latino” can be used in addition to “Hispanic.”
     
  • Not Hispanic - A person not of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

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Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, ethnicity data for all households served – including both one-on-one counseling clients and group education participants. Agencies should encourage households whose members have different ethnicities to self-identify the one ethnicity that will be recorded – e.g. by using the ethnicity of the person completing the intake form. Ethnicity data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded in 3c as ‘chose not to respond.’

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Section 4: Race of Households

Record the race of households using the options below. Race categories are mandated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Households should self-identify their race, choosing between the options available in 4a through 4j. The following descriptions serve as a guide for self-identification. 

  • Single Race:
     
    • American Indian or Alaskan Native - A person having origins with any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community recognition.
       
    • Asian - A person having origins with any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian Subcontinent, including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
       
    • Black or African American - A person having origins in the black racial groups of Africa. For example, individuals self-reporting in this category may refer to themselves as “Haitian”, “Black” or “African-American.”
       
    • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander - A person having origin in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
       
    • White - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.
       
  • Multi-Race
     
    • American Indian or Alaska Native and White
       
    • Asian and White
       
    • Black or African American and White
       
    • American Indian or Alaska Native and Black or African American
       
    • Other multiple race
       
  • Chose not to respond

Note: Since 2003, the Federal Government has defined Hispanic as an ethnicity (Section 3), not a race.

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Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, race data for all households served – including both one-on-one counseling clients and group education participants. Agencies should encourage households whose members have different races to self-identify the one ethnicity that will be recorded – e.g. by using the race of the person completing the intake form. Race data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded in 4k as ‘chose not to respond.’

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Section 5: Income Levels

Enter the household’s income level based on the percentage of the Area Median Income (AMI) for the geographic area, adjusted for family size. Some CMSs allow HCAs to enter a client’s monthly or annual household income. The CMS then automatically records the client’s household income into one of the income level brackets shown below. If your CMS does not include this feature, you can find AMI data by geographic area and family size on HUDUser.gov. Instructions for how to use the AMI data is available on HUD.gov in slides 33 – 35.

  • < 30% of Area Median Income (AMI)
     
  • 30 - 49% of AMI
     
  • 50 - 79% of AMI
     
  • 80 - 100% of AMI
     
  • > 100% AMI
     
  • Chose not to respond

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Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, income data for all households served – including both one-on-one counseling clients and group education participants. Income data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded in 5f as ‘chose not to respond.’

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Section 6: Rural Area Status

Record households’ rural area status using the categories below. Rural areas are defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at 7 CFR 3550.10. The USDA Income and Property Eligibility website for Single Family Housing programs can serve as a guide for determining whether or not a household lives in a rural area. The USDA Eligibility - Service Description Document provides further information for CMS vendors.

  • Household lives in a rural area
     
  • Household does not live in a rural area
     
  • Chose not to respond
     

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Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, rural area status data for all households served – including both one-on-one counseling clients and group education participants. Rural area status data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded in 6c as ‘chose not to respond.’

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Section 7: Limited English Proficiency Status

Record households’ limited English proficiency status for each of the categories below. Individuals who do not speak English as their primary language and who have a limited ability to read, speak, write, or understand English can be limited English proficient, or “LEP.” These individuals may be entitled language assistance with respect to a particular type or service, benefit, or encounter. For additional information, see www.lep.gov.

  • Household is Limited English Proficient
     
  • Household is not Limited English Proficient
     
  • Chose not to respond
     

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Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, LEP status data for all households served – including both one-on-one counseling clients and group education participants. LEP status data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded in 7c as ‘chose not to respond.’

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Section 8: Households Receiving Group Education, by Purpose

Record the number of households receiving group education using the categories below. Education differs from counseling in that it is usually conducted in a group setting and is not tailored to the unique circumstance of the individual. To be recorded in this section, a household must have received group education services meeting the requirements outlined in HUD Handbook 7610.1, or meet internet education requirements, if applicable. See paragraph 1-4 item G on p 3 for HUD's definition of education services, and paragraph 5-8 on p 49 for group education file requirements. Marketing and outreach activities such as fliers mailed or calls made should not be recorded.

  • Completed financial literacy workshop, including home affordability, budgeting and understanding use of credit
     
  • Completed predatory lending, loan scam or other fraud prevention workshop
     
  • Completed fair housing workshop
     
  • Completed homelessness prevention workshop
     
  • Completed rental workshop
     
  • Completed pre-purchase homebuyer education workshop
     
  • Completed non-delinquency post-purchase workshop, including home maintenance and/or financial management for homeowners
     
  • Completed resolving or preventing mortgage delinquency workshop
     
  • Completed other workshop

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Section 9: Households Receiving One-on-One Counseling, by Purpose

Enter the number of households to whom the agency provided one-on-one housing counseling during the reporting period, using the categories below*. Counseling goes beyond group education, addresses unique circumstances, is more rigorous, and involves one-on-one and longer-term relationships. To be recorded in this section, a household must have received counseling services meeting the requirements outlined in HUD Handbook 7610.1. See paragraph 3-5 on pp 21-23 for the minimum requirements a housing counselor must perform and document for a client to be classified as counseled under HUD's housing counseling program. Marketing and outreach activities such as fliers mailed or calls made should not be recorded.

  • Homeless Assistance – information regarding emergency shelter, other emergency services, and transitional housing.
     
  • Rental Topics – HUD rental and rent subsidy programs; other federal, state or local assistance; fair housing; housing search assistance; landlord tenant laws; lease terms; rent delinquency.
     
  • Prepurchase/Homebuying – advice regarding readiness and preparation, Federal Housing Administration-insured financing, housing selection and mobility, search assistance, fair housing and predatory lending, budgeting and credit, loan product comparison, purchase procedures, and closing costs.
     
  • Home Maintenance and Financial Management for Homeowners (Non-Delinquency Post Purchase) – escrow funds, budgeting, refinancing, home equity, home improvement, utility costs, energy efficiency, rights and responsibilities of home owners.
     
  • Reverse Mortgage – A reverse mortgage is a mortgage product that pays a homeowner loan proceeds drawn from accumulated home equity and that requires no repayment until a future time. The Federal Housing Administration’s reverse mortgage product is the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage. Please see additional information on HECM in Chapter 4 and Appendix 4 of HUD Handbook 7610.1.
     
  • Resolving or Preventing Mortgage Delinquency or Default – default and foreclosure, loss mitigation, budgeting, and credit.

*Financial counseling is not counted as its own separate counseling type. HUD defines housing counseling as counselor to client assistance that addresses unique financial circumstances or housing issues and focuses on ways of overcoming specific obstacles to achieving a housing goal. Financial management and/or budget services can be an important component, but the primary focus of housing counseling is on achieving a housing goal.

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Section 10: Impact and Scope of One-on-One Counseling Services


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Throughout this section, click on the links to reveal more information and tips beneath each heading.


Getting Started:

light bulbRemember: Follow-up is mandatory. Even though some outcomes are known upon the completion of the counseling session, most will require the counselor to determine the outcomes through follow-up with the client. Follow-up should be done in person or via the telephone within 60 days from the date of the last client contact.

Record the Impact and Scope of One-on-One Counseling Services for each of the following categories:

light bulbThis is a simple count of households that receive both one-on-one counseling and group education. This outcome can be reported immediately if the client attended a group education session prior to counseling. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to the total of Section 9 Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Are assisted with filing a fair housing complaint;
  • Are counseled and referred to a legal aid agency for fair housing assistance;
  • Receive one-on-one counseling and also attend a fair housing workshop;
  • Receive information on discriminatory housing and mortgage lending practices and the rights and remedies available under federal, state and local laws;
  • Receive mobility counseling to help move to housing not located in areas of poverty concentration or minority concentration; and/or
  • Receive information about housing opportunities in areas that provide community assets such as good schools, health care, transportation and retail opportunities.

This impact can be reported immediately if the client received fair housing information during the counseling session, or in a group education session prior to counseling. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes, or with a copy of fair housing materials provided.

This impact can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbThis is a simple count of all households that received one on one counseling and for whom the counselor developed a budget.

Examples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Develop a household budget during the counseling session;
  • Review household’s existing budget during the counseling session and suggested modifications (e.g., reduce non-critical expenses); and/or
  • Determine savings or assets to cover needs or may be able to obtain a loan.

By sustainable, HUD means a realistic and do-able budget for that household. Counselors do not have to verify that the household actually implements and sustains the budget.

A sustainable budget is a budget where a client’s income meets or exceeds his or her expenses. It can be based on estimated or actual expenses and income. A budget may also be considered sustainable if the budget demonstrates that the client can or cannot afford to live in their current housing and shows the client a path to a positive net income. A sustainable budget is one which gives the client clear choices in difficult situations. For clients that are unemployed with no income, it may still be possible for the counselor to develop a sustainable household budget with the client.

Check the number of budgets reported in 10c compared to the number of counseling clients reported in Section 9. If the number of budgets in 10c is significantly lower than the Section 9 total, verify that your agency is reporting all budgets that have been developed. HUD expects this impact will apply to nearly all one-on-one counseling clients because the HUD Housing Counseling Handbook requires establishment of a household budget that the client can afford. This outcome can be reported immediately as a result of counseling.

Attachment B12 of the HECM protocol states that completing the Financial Interview Tool (FIT) meets the program requirement to complete a budget with every counseling client. Therefore, this impact should be recorded for all reverse mortgage counseling clients with whom the counselor completed FIT.

The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. with a copy of the budget developed.

This impact can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Increase their discretionary income by obtaining higher wage employment or decreasing housing payments to free up income for other expenses;
  • Decrease debt load by paying down debts or consolidating them for lower payments;
  • Increase savings by making changes to their budget or obtaining an individual development account; and/or
  • Increase credit score by making changes to credit habits or correcting errors on credit reports.

The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Receive down payment, rental, and/or utility assistance;
  • Enter a lease purchase program;
  • Obtain a non-FHA reverse mortgage;
  • Receive a home equity or home improvement loan or other home repair assistance;
  • Receive weatherization assistance; and/or
  • Obtain emergency shelter, transitional housing, or permanent housing after experiencing homelessness.

What does “gained access” mean? To record a household in this category, at a minimum the counselor must provide referral to a resource or assist with an application for a resource and confirm the household applied for the resource. HCAs do not have to obtain proof that the household actually received the resource. Simply providing the household a flyer or referring them to another entity is not adequate.

Check the number of households gaining access to housing resources reported in 10e. If it is zero, or if it seems very low in comparison with the total counseling clients reported in Section 9, verify that the reporting for Section 10e is accurate and that counselors understand what HUD is looking for when reporting this impact.

The counselor will need to determine this impact through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Enter a debt management plan;
  • Obtain an individual development account;
  • Obtain Medicaid benefits;
  • Are referred for legal assistance and receive legal services; and/or
  • Obtain non-housing emergency assistance such as food or clothing.

What does “gained access” mean? To record a client in this category, at a minimum the counselor must provide referral to a resource or assist with an application for a resource and confirm the client applied for the resource. HCAs do not have to obtain proof that the client actually received the resource. Simply providing the client a flyer or referring them to another entity is not adequate.

The counselor will need to determine this impact through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of Homeless Assistance Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Occupy emergency shelter;
  • Occupy transitional housing;
  • Occupy permanent housing with rental assistance; or
  • Occupy permanent housing without rental assistance.

The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Homeless Assistance Counseling clients reported in Section 9a. So the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9a. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of Rental Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Obtain temporary rental relief; and/or
  • Are referred to a legal aid agency for assistance with eviction and successfully avoid eviction.

The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Rental Counseling clients reported in Section 9b. So the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9b. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of Rental Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Obtain HUD or other rental housing subsidy;
  • Find alternative rental housing;
  • Resolve issue in current tenancy;
  • Bring utilities current;
  • Resolve a security deposit dispute; and/or
  • Have a disability and obtain housing with accessibility features.

The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Rental Counseling clients reported in Section 9b. So the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9b. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbThis is a simple count of all Pre-Purchase Counseling clients that purchased housing after receiving counseling.

The counselor will need to determine this impact through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Pre-Purchase Counseling clients reported in Section 9c. So the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9c. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbThis is a simple count of all reverse mortgage counseling clients that obtain a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM).

The counselor will need to determine this impact through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Reverse Mortgage Counseling clients reported in Section 9e. So the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9e. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of Non-Delinquency Post Purchase Clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Receive a home equity or home improvement loan or other home repair assistance;
  • Receive weatherization assistance;
  • Brought utilities current;
  • Refinance their mortgage to improve affordability; and/or
  • Sell house/choose an alternative housing solution.

The counselor will need to determine this impact through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Non-Delinquency Post Purchase Counseling clients reported in Section 9d. So the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9d. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

light bulbExamples of Resolving/Preventing Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Bring their mortgage current;
  • Refinance their mortgage to prevent/resolve default;
  • Receive a mortgage modification;
  • Receive a second mortgage to prevent/resolve default;
  • Enter a forbearance agreement or repayment plan;
  • Execute a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure;
  • Sell property/choose alternative housing solution;
  • Obtain a short sale or pre-foreclosure sale (FHA mortgage); and/or
  • Obtain partial claim loan from FHA lender.

The counselor will need to determine this impact through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g. in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Resolving/Preventing Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients reported in Section 9f. So the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9f. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

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Section 10 Case Studies

This section contains 2 case studies on the following topics:

  • Pre-Purchase Counseling
  • Rental Housing Counseling

Case Study 1: Pre-purchase Counseling

A client visits your agency for one-on-one pre-purchase counseling. Before attending one-on-one counseling, the client has already completed a homebuyer education workshop. During the counseling session, you work with the client to establish a household budget. You also encourage the client to start saving part of each pay check to establish an emergency fund, and you provide information about down payment assistance programs that may help them achieve their homeownership goal.

How many times will you report the household on your HUD-9902?

  • Twice: The household received two distinct services – homebuyer education and pre-purchase counseling.  So you will report the household twice – two times in each of the appropriate demographic categories in Sections 3-7, once in Section 8f for homebuyer education, and once in Section 9c for pre-purchase counseling.

What outcomes can you report in Section 10 immediately after the counseling session?


Outcome

Yes, report

No, do not report

Reasoning

a. Households that received one-on-one counseling that also received group education services.

 

You know the client received one-on-one counseling and also attended a group education workshop, so you can report this outcome immediately after the counseling session. Make sure the counseling file supports the outcome, e.g. in the client notes.

b. Households that received information on fair housing, fair lending and/or accessibility rights.

 

You did not discuss any fair housing information with this client, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

c. Households for whom counselor developed a sustainable household budget through the provision of financial management and/or budget services.

 

You developed a budget during the counseling session, so you can report this outcome immediately. Make sure the counseling file supports this outcome, e.g. in the client notes, or with a copy of the budget developed.

d. Households that improved their financial capacity (e.g. increased discretionary income, decreased debt load, increased savings, increased credit score) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

You encouraged the client to start saving for emergencies, but you will not know whether the client actually started saving until you have followed up with the client. When you follow up with the client, you will need to ask the client whether or not they started saving.

e. Households that gained access to resources to help them improve their housing situation (e.g. down payment assistance, rental assistance, utility assistance, etc.) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

You gave the client information about down payment assistance programs that may be helpful, but you will not know whether the client applied for that resource until you have followed up with the client. When you follow up with the client, you will need to ask the client whether they applied for the down payment assistance program.

f. Households that gained access to non-housing resources (e.g. social service programs, legal services, public benefits such as Social Security or Medicaid, etc) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

You did not discuss any non-housing resources with this client, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

g. Homeless or potentially homeless households that obtained temporary or permanent housing after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a homeless counseling client reported in Section 9a, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

h. Households that received rental counseling and avoided eviction after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a rental counseling client reported in Section 9b, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

i. Households that received rental counseling and improved living conditions after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a rental counseling client reported in Section9b, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

j. Households that received prepurchase/homebuying counseling and purchased housing after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

You discussed steps the client can take toward achieving their homeownership goal, but you will not know whether the client purchased housing until you have followed up with the client. When you follow up with the client, you will need to ask the client whether they purchased housing.

k. Households that received reverse mortgage counseling and obtained a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a reverse mortgage counseling client reported in Section 9e, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

l. Households that received non-delinquency post-purchase counseling that were able to improve home conditions or home affordability after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a non-delinquency post-purchase counseling client reported in Section 9d, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

m. Households that prevented or resolved a mortgage default after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a mortgage default/delinquency client reported in Section 9f, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

After the initial counseling session, there were three impacts that could potentially apply to the household that you need to ask about during follow-up – 10d (increased financial capacity by saving), 10e (gained access to housing resources by applying for down payment assistance), and 10j (purchased housing). One month after the counseling session, you call the household to follow up regarding their progress in meeting their homeownership goal. You ask whether the clients have started saving for an emergency fund, and the clients confirm they have. You also ask whether they applied for down payment assistance, and the clients explain they decided not to apply because they are not ready for homeownership at this time.

Can you report any additional outcomes after the following up with the client?


Outcome

Yes, report

No, do not report

Reasoning

d. Households that improved their financial capacity (e.g. increased discretionary income, decreased debt load, increased savings, increased credit score) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

You learned that the client increased their savings after receiving counseling, so you should report this outcome after follow up. Make sure the counseling file supports the outcome, e.g. in the client notes.

e. Households that gained access to resources to help them improve their housing situation (e.g. down payment assistance, rental assistance, utility assistance, etc.) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

You learned the client decided not to pursue down payment assistance, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

j. Households that received prepurchase/homebuying counseling and purchased housing after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

You learned the client decided not to purchase housing after receiving counseling, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

Case Study 2: Rental Housing Counseling Case

A client comes in for rental counseling because she has had difficulties with eviction though she is not currently in imminent threat of eviction. She has found herself homeless one time and would like to save some money for emergencies. The first counseling session focuses on eviction prevention, particularly how to approach the landlord with concerns about her apartment. The client and counselor also agree upon a household budget that allows for some savings, with the counselor providing the names of four banks where the client can open an account. The two agree upon another session in two months’ time. At the second session, the client shows some savings at one of the banks. The client also asks about her rights as a tenant, describing settling an issue with her landlord regarding a repair inside the apartment. They agreed the landlord would make the repair this time, although the client would like to better understand her rights and responsibilities since there are often disagreements about who is responsible for repairs. The counselor describes fair housing laws and provides a name and number for the local legal assistance agency.

What outcomes can you report and when can you report them?


Outcome

Yes, report

No, do not report

Reasoning

a. Households that received one-on-one counseling that also received group education services.

 

The client did not receive any group education, only counseling.

b. Households that received information on fair housing, fair lending and/or accessibility rights.

 

After a second session the counselor can count this outcome, having provided fair housing information and a referral to a legal assistance agency. Make sure the counseling file supports the outcome, e.g. in the client notes.

c. Households for whom counselor developed a sustainable household budget through the provision of financial management and/or budget services.

 

The counselor and client developed a sustainable budget during the first session, so the counselor can report this outcome after the first session. Make sure, the counseling file supports the outcome, e.g. in the client notes or with a copy of the budget developed.

d. Households that improved their financial capacity (e.g. increased discretionary income, decreased debt load, increased savings, increased credit score) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

During the second session, the counselor learned the client was able to save some money in a new account, putting her in a better financial position. This would be reported after the second session. Make sure the counseling file supports the outcome, e.g. in the client notes.

e. Households that gained access to resources to help them improve their housing situation (e.g. down payment assistance, rental assistance, utility assistance, etc.) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

While the counselor made a referral to housing-related legal assistance, there was no confirmation that any assistance was sought or received. When following up with the client, you will need to ask whether they applied for the legal assistance. If the client confirms they did apply, you would make a note in the counseling file and report the outcome under 10.e.

f. Households that gained access to non-housing resources (e.g. social service programs, legal services, public benefits such as Social Security or Medicaid, etc) after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

While the counselor made a referral to a legal assistance agency, they have no confirmation that any assistance was sought or received. Had there been confirmation that legal assistance was provided, this outcome would have been reportable under 10.f.

g. Homeless or potentially homeless households that obtained temporary or permanent housing after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is rental counseling client reported in Section 9b, not a homeless counseling client reported in Section 9a. So it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

h. Households that received rental counseling and avoided eviction after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

The client was not in imminent threat of eviction.

i. Households that received rental counseling and improved living conditions after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

The client resolved an issue in her tenancy that has improved her living conditions, by making her tenancy more stable. This can be reported after the second session.The client resolved an issue in her tenancy that has improved her living conditions, by making her tenancy more stable. This can be reported after the second session. Make sure the counseling file supports the outcome, e.g. in the client notes.

j. Households that received prepurchase/homebuying counseling and purchased housing after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a pre-purchase counseling client reported in Section 9c, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

k. Households that received reverse mortgage counseling and obtained a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a reverse mortgage counseling client reported in Section 9e, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.

l. Households that received non-delinquency post-purchase counseling that were able to improve home conditions or home affordability after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a non-delinquency post-purchase counseling client reported in Section 9d, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome..

m. Households that prevented or resolved a mortgage default after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

 

This is not a mortgage default/delinquency client reported in Section 9f, so it would not be appropriate to report this outcome.