Completing the HUD-9902 Report

This page explores the HUD-9902 section by section and provides users with tips and examples for filling out the form.

This toolkit reflects the updates to the HUD-9902 form effective Fiscal Year (FY) 2022.

Download the Full FY 2022 Toolkit (PDF)

For agencies still reporting on the HUD-9902 form for FY 2021, the guidance from the previous version of this toolkit is still available as a PDF.

Download the Full Toolkit for FY 2021 and Prior (PDF)

Find by Section

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Section 1: Counseling Agency Name

Verify, in HCS, that the name, ID, type, and address of your agency (and intermediary, if applicable) are correct as they appear on the HUD-9902.

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Make any necessary changes through your CMS application (preferable), or through HUD’s HCS system if you are unable to update it through your CMS. Contact your HUD Point of Contact (POC) regarding “Agency Type” changes.

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Section 2: Reporting Period and Budget

Verify that the reporting period and date submitted are correct as they appear on the HUD-9902. Include your total annual housing counseling program budget (all sources).

The start, or “From”, date is automatically populated, set at the beginning of the fiscal year. The end, or “To”, date is automatically populated, set at the end date of the selected reporting period. Verify that the report period is correct. The submission date will be automatically populated upon submission.

View more information about the reporting period dates on the 9902 General Overview page.

This report must reflect the cumulative housing counseling and education activity of an agency, for a portion of the year (e.g., quarterly), or for the complete fiscal year. Even if your agency was approved by HUD for less than the full year report period, include households served since the beginning of the applicable fiscal year.

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For the “Total Annual Housing Counseling Program Budget, All Sources”, enter (preferably through your CMS application, or through HUD’s HCS system if you are unable to change it through your CMS) the total annual housing counseling budget for all funding sources. This figure should reflect the total budget, including all HUD grants and other funding sources, for the full fiscal year, for your housing counseling program exclusively. This is the budget that corresponds to the activities recorded in the “All Counseling and Education Activities” column (i.e., the total annual program budget that will be used to serve the households reported in the “All Counseling and Education Activities” column).

It is essential that the total budget figure be accurate, and HUD will request source documentation to verify the total during monitoring reviews. Use HCS to verify that the total annual housing counseling program budget attributed to your agency is correct. If incorrect, or if changes occur throughout the fiscal year, make any necessary revisions through your CMS application, if applicable, or through HUD’s HCS system. A total annual budget amount must be entered whether or not a HUD grant was awarded for the reporting period.

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Section 3: Ethnicity

New

New in FY 2022: HUD is now requiring sections 3, 4, 6, and 7 to report on the individual level instead of the household level. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Section 3 can only record the ethnicity demographic information of one individual, even if there are multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different ethnicity types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the ethnicity, choosing from 3a through 3c, of the individual that will be recorded.

Ethnicity categories are mandated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The following descriptions serve as a guide for self-identification.

  • Hispanic - A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term “Spanish origin” or “Latino” can be used in addition to “Hispanic”.
     
  • Not Hispanic - A person not of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

Data Collection Tips

Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, and record demographic data for education services participants. Record the information of one individual, even if there are multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Demographic data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded as “chose not to respond”. The “chose not to respond” option should be used on a limited basis and under the circumstances described above.

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Check the number of clients that have been reported as “chose not to respond” in 3c. If the number is high compared to the total number of clients served, verify that the reporting is accurate and that your agency has mechanisms in place for collecting the required ethnicity information from all households.

This total should be the same as the totals for Sections 4, 5, 6, and 7, and the same as the total of Sections 8 + 9.

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Section 4: Race

New

New in FY 2022: HUD is now requiring sections 3, 4, 6, and 7 to report on the individual level instead of the household level. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Section 4 can only record the race demographic information of one individual, even if there are multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different race types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the race, choosing from 4a through 4g, of the individual that will be recorded.

Race categories are mandated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The following descriptions serve as a guide for self-identification.

  • American Indian or Alaskan Native - A person having origins with any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community recognition.
  • Asian - A person having origins with any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian Subcontinent, including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American - A person having origins in the black racial groups of Africa. For example, individuals self-reporting in this category may refer to themselves as “Haitian”, “Black” or “African-American”.
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander - A person having origin in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • White - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.
  • More than one race
  • Chose not to respond

Note: Since 2003, the Federal Government has defined Hispanic as an ethnicity (Section 3), not a race.

Data Collection Tips

Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, and record demographic data for education services participants. Record the information of one individual, even if there are multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Demographic data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded as “chose not to respond”. The “chose not to respond” option should be used on a limited basis and under the circumstances described above.

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Check the number of clients that have been reported as “chose not to respond” in 4g. If the number is high compared to the total number of clients served, verify that the reporting is accurate and that your agency has mechanisms in place for collecting the required race information from all households.

This total should be the same as the totals for Sections 3, 5, 6, and 7, and the same as the total of Sections 8 + 9.

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Section 5: Income Levels

Record income data for each individual counseling and group education household receiving a distinct service during the reporting period. Enter the household’s income level based on the percentage of the Area Median Income (AMI) for the geographic area, adjusted for family size. Some CMSs allow HCAs to enter a client’s monthly or annual household income. The CMS then automatically records the client’s household income into one of the income level brackets shown below. If your CMS does not include this feature, you can find AMI data by geographic area and family size on HUDUser.gov. Instructions for how to use the AMI data is available on HUD.gov in slides 33 – 35.

  • < 30% of Area Median Income (AMI)
  • 30 - 49% of AMI
  • 50 - 79% of AMI
  • 80 - 100% of AMI
  • > 100% AMI
  • Chose not to respond

Data Collection Tips

Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, and record demographic data for education services participants. Section 5, Income Levels, can be recorded by household.

Demographic data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded as “chose not to respond”. The “chose not to respond” option should be used on a limited basis and under the circumstances described above.

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Check the number of clients that have been reported as “chose not to respond” in 5f. If the number is high compared to the total number of clients served, verify that the reporting is accurate and that your agency has mechanisms in place for collecting the required income information from all households.

This total should be the same as the totals for Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7, and the same as the total of Sections 8 + 9.

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Section 6: Rural Area Status

New

New in FY 2022: HUD is now requiring sections 3, 4, 6, and 7 to report on the individual level instead of the household level. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Section 6 can only record the rural area status information of one individual, even if multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different rural area status types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the status, choosing from 6a through 6c, of the individual that will be recorded.

Rural areas are defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at 7 CFR 3550.10. The USDA Income and Property Eligibility website for Single Family Housing programs can serve as a guide for determining whether or not a household lives in a rural area. The USDA Eligibility - Service Description Document provides further information for CMS vendors.

  • Lives in a rural area
  • Does not live in a rural area
  • Chose not to respond

Data Collection Tips

Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, and record demographic data for education services participants. Record the information of one individual, even if there are multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Demographic data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded as “chose not to respond”. The “chose not to respond” option should be used on a limited basis and under the circumstances described above.

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Check the number of clients that have been reported as “chose not to respond” in 6c. If the number is high compared to the total number of clients served, verify that the reporting is accurate and that your agency has mechanisms in place for collecting the required rural area status information from all households.

This total should be the same as the totals for Sections 3, 4, 5, and 7, and the same as the total of Sections 8 + 9.

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Section 7: Limited English Proficiency Status

New

New in FY 2022: HUD is now requiring sections 3, 4, 6, and 7 to report on the individual level instead of the household level. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Section 7 can only record the LEP status information of one individual, even if there are multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different LEP status types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the status, choosing from 7a through 7c, of the individual that will be recorded.

Individuals who do not speak English as their primary language and who have a limited ability to read, speak, write, or understand English can be limited English proficient, or “LEP.” These individuals may be entitled language assistance with respect to a particular type or service, benefit, or encounter. For additional information, see www.lep.gov.

  • Limited English Proficient
  • Not Limited English Proficient
  • Chose not to respond
     

Data Collection Tips

Counseling agencies are required to discreetly collect, for example through a sign-in sheet or participant survey, and record demographic data for education services participants. Record the information of one individual, even if there are multiple individuals within a household attending an activity to be recorded. If the individuals identify with different demographic types, encourage the attendees to choose/self-identify the demographic of only one of the individuals to be recorded in Sections 3, 4, 6, and 7. The same selected individual’s information should be recorded in these sections.

Demographic data for households who are unwilling or unable to self-identify should be recorded as “chose not to respond”. The “chose not to respond” option should be used on a limited basis and under the circumstances described above.

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Check the number of clients that have been reported as “chose not to respond” in 7c. If the number is high compared to the total number of clients served, verify that the reporting is accurate and that your agency has mechanisms in place for collecting the required LEP status information from all households.

This total should be the same as the totals for Sections 3, 4, 5, and 6, and the same as the total of Sections 8 + 9.

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Section 8: Households Receiving Education, by Purpose

New

New in FY 2022: The following types of education are new or updated for FY 2022: i. Completed disaster preparedness assistance workshop; and j. Completed disaster recovery assistance workshop.

Record the number of households that attend and complete an educational workshop or online education. Education differs from counseling in that it is usually conducted in a group setting and is not tailored to the unique circumstance of the individual. Online education administered by participating Housing Counseling Agencies or accessed by households through the actions of participating Housing Counseling Agencies can be recorded also. Households completing multiple, distinct courses or group sessions should be recorded for each course or group session completed.

To be recorded in this section, a household must have received group education services meeting the requirements outlined in HUD Handbook 7610.1, or meet internet education requirements, if applicable. See paragraph 1-4 item G on p 3 for HUD's definition of education services, and paragraph 5-8 on p 49 for group education file requirements. Marketing and outreach activities such as fliers mailed or calls made should not be recorded.

  • 8a. Completed financial literacy workshop, including home affordability, budgeting, and understanding use of credit
  • 8b. Completed predatory lending, loan scam, or other fraud prevention workshop
  • 8c. Completed fair housing workshop
  • 8d. Completed homelessness prevention workshop
  • 8e. Completed rental workshop
  • 8f. Completed pre-purchase homebuyer education workshop
  • 8g. Completed non-delinquency post-purchase workshop, including home maintenance and/or financial management for homeowners
  • 8h. Completed resolving or preventing mortgage delinquency workshop
  • 8i. Completed disaster preparedness assistance workshop
  • 8j. Completed Disaster recovery assistance workshop
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Group education services reported in Section 8 should align with the services included in the agency’s HUD-approved work plan and HCS profile (e.g., If rental workshops are not included in an agency’s HUD-approved work plan and/or HCS profile, then the agency should not report rental workshop activity in 8e until those services have been added to the agency’s HUD-approved work plan and HCS profile). Agencies should contact their HUD point of contact for assistance with adding or removing services from its HUD-approved work plan and/or HCS profile.

Households completing multiple, distinct courses or workshops (e.g., a rental workshop and a pre-purchase homebuyer education workshop) should be recorded for each course or workshop completed. By contrast, if a household attends a pre-purchase homebuyer education workshop that takes place over the course of four sessions, that household should only be counted once because they received one distinct service – pre-purchase homebuyer education.

If the number of clients that have been reported as “completed other workshop” in 8i is high compared to the Section 8 Total, verify that the reporting is accurate. This category should only be used if none of the other options available in Section 8 can be used to describe the workshop. If the workshop covers multiple topics (e.g., homebuyer education, fair housing, and predatory lending), choose the predominant subject of the workshop for reporting in Section 8. Do not count the same workshop multiple times even if it covers more than one topic.

This total plus the Section 9 total should be the same as the totals for Sections 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7.

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Section 9: Households Receiving One-on-One Counseling, by Purpose

New

New in FY 2022: The following types of one-on-one counseling are new or updated for FY 2022: f. Resolving or Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency or Default; g. Resolving or Preventing Reverse Mortgage Delinquency or Default; h. Disaster Preparedness Assistance; and i. Disaster Recovery Assistance.

Enter the number of households to whom the agency provided one-on-one housing counseling during the reporting period, by purpose of their visit, using the categories below*. Count households who entered the agency’s workload the previous fiscal year but who carried over into and received counseling on the same topic during the current fiscal year.

Example: The Mendez household began receiving prepurchase housing counseling services in August of 2021 and completed their prepurchase client action plan in December of 2021. The housing counseling agency would report on the Mendez household in both fiscal years, 2021 and 2022.

Counseling goes beyond group education, addresses unique circumstances, is more rigorous, and involves one-on-one and longer-term relationships. To be recorded in this section, a household must have received counseling services meeting the requirements outlined in HUD Handbook 7610.1. See paragraph 3-5 on pp 21-23 for the minimum requirements a housing counselor must perform and document for a client to be classified as counseled under HUD's housing counseling program. Marketing and outreach activities such as fliers mailed or calls made should not be recorded.

  • 9a. Homeless Assistance – information regarding emergency shelter, other emergency services, and transitional housing.
     
  • 9b. Rental Topics – HUD rental and rent subsidy programs; other federal, state, or local assistance; fair housing; housing search assistance; landlord tenant laws; lease terms; rent delinquency.
     
  • 9c. Prepurchase/Homebuying – advice regarding readiness and preparation, Federal Housing Administration-insured financing, housing selection and mobility, search assistance, fair housing and predatory lending, budgeting and credit, loan product comparison, purchase procedures, and closing costs.
     
  • 9d. Non-Delinquency Post Purchase – escrow funds, budgeting, refinancing, home equity, home improvement, utility costs, energy efficiency, and rights and responsibilities of homeowners.
     
  • 9e. Reverse Mortgage – a reverse mortgage is a mortgage product that pays a homeowner loan proceeds drawn from accumulated home equity and that requires no repayment until a future time. The Federal Housing Administration’s reverse mortgage product is the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage. Please see additional information on HECM in Chapter 4 and Appendix 4 of HUD Handbook 7610.1.
     
  • 9f. Resolving or Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency or Default – default and foreclosure, loss mitigation, budgeting, and credit.
     
  • 9g. Resolving or Preventing Reverse Mortgage Delinquency or Default – client/lender workout agreements for taxes and insurance, how to secure housing upon leaving the HECM property, resolution of outstanding debt with borrower estate or facilitating the transfer to the lender.
     
  • 9h. Disaster Preparedness Assistance – preparing and implementing an emergency preparedness plan.
     
  • 9i. Disaster Recovery Assistance – referrals to, and the provision of recovery assistance resources for relocation, re-housing, and/or rebuilding.

*Financial counseling is not counted as its own separate counseling type. HUD defines housing counseling as counselor to client assistance that addresses unique financial circumstances or housing issues and focuses on ways of overcoming specific obstacles to achieving a housing goal. Financial management and/or budget services can be an important component, but the primary focus of housing counseling is on achieving a housing goal.

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One-on-one counseling services reported in Section 9 should align with the services included in the agency’s HUD-approved work plan and HCS profile, with the exception of reverse mortgage counseling, approval for which is tracked through HUD’s HECM Roster rather than the HCS profile. For example, if homeless assistance counseling is not included in an agency’s HUD-approved work plan and HCS profile, then the agency should not report homeless assistance counseling activity in 9a until those services have been added to the agency’s HUD-approved work plan and HCS profile.

Households completing multiple, distinct types of counseling during the reporting period (e.g., rental counseling and pre-purchase counseling) should be recorded for each type of counseling received. By contrast, if a household receives pre-purchase counseling that takes place over the course of 4 sessions, that household should only be counted once because they received one distinct service – pre-purchase counseling. Households can be carried over from the last fiscal year if they received counseling on the same topic during the current fiscal year.

Households receiving financial management and/or budget services should be reported in Section 9 under the applicable type of counseling (e.g., a renter receiving financial management and/or budget services would be reported as receiving Rental Topics counseling). That same household could also be reported in Section 10.c. (developing a budget), as well as any other applicable Section 10 categories, to show the impact and scope of that counseling.

Households with a Fair Housing Complaint should be reported in Section 9 under the applicable type of counseling (e.g., a renter with a Fair Housing Complaint would be reported as receiving Rental Topics counseling). That same household would also be reported in Section 10.b. (Households that received information on fair housing, fair lending and/or accessibility rights), and in any other applicable Section 10 categories, to show the impact and scope of that counseling.

The Section 9 total plus the Section 8 total should be the same as the totals for Sections 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7.

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Section 10: Outcome of One-on-One Counseling Services

New

New in FY 2022: The following outcomes are new or updated for FY 2022: h. Households gained access to disaster recovery non-housing resources after receiving Housing Counseling Services; i. Households obtained disaster recovery housing resources after receiving Housing Counseling Services; j. Households for whom counselor developed or updated an emergency preparedness plan; q. Households that prevented or resolved a reverse mortgage default after receiving Housing Counseling Services; r. Households that received a forward mortgage modification and remained current in their modified mortgage after receiving Housing Counseling Services; and s. Households that received a forward mortgage modification and improved their financial capacity after receiving Housing Counseling Services.

Getting Started:

This section is used to report the outcome of the housing counseling services reported in Section 9.

Remember: Follow-up is mandatory. Even though some outcomes are known upon the completion of the counseling session, most will require the counselor to determine the outcomes through follow-up with the client. Follow-up should be done in person or via the telephone within 60 days from the date of the last client contact.

Record the Outcome and Scope of One-on-One Counseling Services for each of the following categories:

This is a simple count of households that receive both one-on-one counseling and group education. This outcome can be reported immediately if the client attended a group education session prior to counseling. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to the total of Section 9 Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Are assisted with filing a fair housing complaint;
  • Are counseled and referred to a legal aid agency for fair housing assistance;
  • Receive one-on-one counseling and also attend a fair housing workshop;
  • Receive information on discriminatory housing and mortgage lending practices and the rights and remedies available under federal, state and local laws;
  • Receive mobility counseling to help move to housing not located in areas of poverty concentration or minority concentration; and/or
  • Receive information about housing opportunities in areas that provide community assets such as good schools, health care, transportation and retail opportunities.

This outcome can be reported immediately if the client received fair housing information during the counseling session, or in a group education session prior to counseling. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes, or with a copy of fair housing materials provided.

This outcome can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

This is a simple count of all households that received one on one counseling and for whom the counselor developed a budget.

Examples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Develop a household budget during the counseling session;
  • Review household’s existing budget during the counseling session and suggested modifications (e.g., reduce non-critical expenses); and/or
  • Determine savings or assets to cover needs or may be able to obtain a loan.
  • By customized, HUD means a realistic and do-able budget for that household. Counselors do not have to verify that the household actually implements and follows the budget.

A customized budget can be based on estimated or actual expenses and income. A budget may demonstrate that the client can or cannot afford to live in their current housing. A customized budget should give the client clear choices in difficult situations. For clients that are unemployed with no income, it may still be possible for the counselor to develop a customized budget with the client.

Check the number of budgets reported in 10c compared to the number of counseling clients reported in Section 9. If the number of budgets in 10c is significantly lower than the Section 9 total, verify that your agency is reporting all budgets that have been developed. HUD expects this outcome will apply to nearly all one-on-one counseling clients because the HUD Housing Counseling Handbook requires establishment of a household budget that the client can afford. This outcome can be reported immediately as a result of counseling.

Attachment B12 of the HECM protocol states that completing the Financial Interview Tool (FIT) meets the program requirement to complete a budget with every counseling client. Therefore, this outcome should be recorded for all reverse mortgage counseling clients with whom the counselor completed FIT.

The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., with a copy of the budget developed.

This outcome can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Increase their discretionary income by obtaining higher wage employment or decreasing housing payments to free up income for other expenses;
  • Decrease debt load by paying down debts or consolidating them for lower payments;
  • Increase savings by making changes to their budget or obtaining an individual development account; and/or
  • Increase credit score by making changes to credit habits or correcting errors on credit reports.

The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of households who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to those who:

  • Receive down payment, rental, and/or utility assistance;
  • Enter a lease purchase program;
  • Obtain a non-FHA reverse mortgage;
  • Receive a home equity or home improvement loan or other home repair assistance;
  • Receive weatherization assistance; and/or
  • Obtain emergency shelter, transitional housing, or permanent housing after experiencing homelessness.

What does “gained access” mean? To record a household in this category, at a minimum the counselor must provide referral to a resource or assist with an application for a resource and confirm the household applied for the resource. HCAs do not have to obtain proof that the household actually received the resource. Simply providing the household a flyer or referring them to another entity is not adequate.

Check the number of households gaining access to housing resources reported in 10e. If it is zero, or if it seems very low in comparison with the total counseling clients reported in Section 9, verify that the reporting for Section 10e is accurate and that counselors understand what HUD is looking for when reporting this outcome.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Enter a debt management plan;
  • Obtain an individual development account;
  • Obtain Medicaid benefits;
  • Are referred for legal assistance and receive legal services; and/or
  • Obtain non-housing emergency assistance such as food or clothing.

What does “gained access” mean? To record a client in this category, at a minimum the counselor must provide referral to a resource or assist with an application for a resource and confirm the client applied for the resource. HCAs do not have to obtain proof that the client actually received the resource. Simply providing the client a flyer or referring them to another entity is not adequate.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can apply to any household reported in Section 9. The number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of Homeless Assistance Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Occupy emergency shelter;
  • Occupy transitional housing;
  • Occupy permanent housing with rental assistance; or
  • Occupy permanent housing without rental assistance.

The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Homeless Assistance Counseling clients reported in Section 9a. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9a. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

New in FY 2022

Examples of disaster assistance and recovery clients who should be recorded in the category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Receive information on emergency services (e.g., Red Cross, legal services)
  • Achieve financial support through the receipt of services (e.g., FEMA)

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to clients reported in Section 9h. Disaster Preparedness Assistance and 9i. Disaster Recovery Assistance. Therefore the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to the sum of Section 9h + Section 9i. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

New in FY 2022

Examples of disaster assistance and recovery clients who should be recorded in the category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Occupy temporary shelter
  • Receive assistance to rehabilitate personal home
  • Temporarily or permanently relocated to safe housing

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to clients reported in Section 9h. Disaster Preparedness Assistance and 9i. Disaster Recovery Assistance. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to the sum of Section 9h + Section 9i. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

New in FY 2022

This is a simple count of all Disaster Preparedness Assistance clients that developed and emergency preparedness plan.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Pre-Purchase Counseling clients reported in Section 9c. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9c. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of Rental Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Obtain temporary rental relief; and/or
  • Are referred to a legal aid agency for assistance with eviction and successfully avoid eviction.

The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Rental Counseling clients reported in Section 9b. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9b. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of Rental Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Obtain HUD or other rental housing subsidy;
  • Find alternative rental housing;
  • Resolve issue in current tenancy;
  • Bring utilities current;
  • Resolve a security deposit dispute; and/or
  • Have a disability and obtain housing with accessibility features.
  • The counselor will need to determine outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Rental Counseling clients reported in Section 9b. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9b. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

This is a simple count of all Pre-Purchase Counseling clients that purchased housing after receiving counseling.

The counselor will need to determine this impact through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this impact, e.g., in the client notes.

This impact can only apply to Pre-Purchase Counseling clients reported in Section 9c. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9c. Households that attended group education but no one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

This is a simple count of all reverse mortgage counseling clients that obtain a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM).

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Reverse Mortgage Counseling clients reported in Section 9e. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9e. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of Non-Delinquency Post Purchase Clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Receive a home equity or home improvement loan or other home repair assistance;
  • Receive weatherization assistance;
  • Brought utilities current;
  • Refinance their mortgage to improve affordability; and/or
  • Sell house/choose an alternative housing solution.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Non-Delinquency Post Purchase Counseling clients reported in Section 9d. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9d. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

Examples of Resolving/Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Bring their mortgage current;
  • Refinance their mortgage to prevent/resolve default;
  • Receive a mortgage modification;
  • Receive a second mortgage to prevent/resolve default;
  • Enter a forbearance agreement or repayment plan;
  • Execute a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure;
  • Sell property/choose alternative housing solution;
  • Obtain a short sale or pre-foreclosure sale (FHA mortgage); and/or
  • Obtain partial claim loan from FHA lender.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Resolving/Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients reported in Section 9f. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9f. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

New in FY 2022

Examples of Resolving/Preventing Reverse Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category include but are not limited to clients who:

  • Client/lender work out agreements for taxes and insurance;
  • Client determines how to secure housing upon leaving the HECM property;
  • Resolving outstanding debt with borrower estate or facilitating the transfer to the lender.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g. in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Resolving/Preventing Reverse Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients reported in Section 9g. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9g. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

New in FY 2022

This is a simple count of clients who received one-on-one Resolving/Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling and subsequently received a forward mortgage modification and remained current in their modified mortgage.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Resolving/Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients reported in Section 9f. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9f. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

New in FY 2022

Examples of Resolving/Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients who should be recorded in this category are clients who received a forward mortgage modification, as well as improved their financial capacity according to the following examples:

  • Decrease debt load by paying down debts or consolidating them for lower payments;
  • Increase savings by making changes to their budget; and/or
  • Increase credit score by making changes to credit habits or correcting errors on credit reports.

The counselor will need to determine this outcome through follow-up with the client. The counseling file should support this outcome, e.g., in the client notes.

This outcome can only apply to Resolving/Preventing Forward Mortgage Delinquency/Default Counseling clients reported in Section 9f. Therefore, the number reported in this category should be less than or equal to total in Section 9f. Households that attended group education, but not one-on-one counseling should not be reported in this or any other Section 10 category.

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Section 10 Case Studies

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Section 11: HUD Housing Counseling Grant Data

If applicable, verify in HCS that all HUD Housing Counseling Program grants, including any supplemental funding, sub-grants, and/or Branch funding amounts received by your agency for the reporting period are accurately listed. For example, funds received for the activities of one or more HECM Network Counselors, if applicable, will be listed separately from a comprehensive counseling grant received directly from HUD. Supplemental funding, such as for HECM Counseling, or discretionary awards, will also be listed separately. Contact your HUD POC if you believe that any of the amounts attributed to your agency are incorrect. For sub-grants, contact the relevant Intermediary, Multi-State Organization, or State Housing Finance Agency so that they can make any necessary changes, if applicable, using the sub-allocation tool in HCS.

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Section 12: Authorization

Submission of this form constitutes a certification by the Agency Official listed that the information provided on the form and in any accompanying documentation is true and accurate. The submission is an acknowledgement that making, presenting, or submitting a false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement, representation, or certification may result in criminal, civil, and/or administrative sanctions, including fines, penalties, and imprisonment. Enter the requested information regarding the Agency Official who has input the HUD-9902 data.